Project Management

Good Article on Why AI Projects Fail

Posted on Updated on

high angle photo of robot
Photo by Alex Knight on Pexels.com

Today I ran across this article that was very good as it focused on lessons learned, which potentially helps everyone interested in these topics. It contained a good mix of problems at a non-technical level.

Below is the link to the article, as well as commentary on the Top 3 items listed from my perspective.

https://www.cio.com/article/3429177/6-reasons-why-ai-projects-fail.html

Item #1: 

The article starts by discussing how the “problem” being evaluated was misstated using technical terms. It led me to believe that at least some of these efforts are conducted “in a vacuum.” That was a surprise given the cost and strategic importance of getting these early-adopter AI projects right.

In Sales and Marketing you start the question, “What problem are we trying to solve?” and evolve that to, “How would customers or prospects describe this problem in their own words?” Without that understanding, you can neither initially vet the solution nor quickly qualify the need for your solution when speaking with those customers or prospects. That leaves a lot of room for error when transitioning from strategy to execution.

Increased collaboration with Business would likely have helped. This was touched on at the end of the article under “Cultural challenges,” but the importance seemed to be downplayed. Lessons learned are valuable – especially when you are able to learn from the mistakes of others. To me, this should have been called out early as a major lesson learned.

Item #2: 

This second area had to do with the perspective of the data, whether that was the angle of the subject in photographs (overhead from a drone vs horizontal from the shoreline) or the type of customer data evaluated (such as from a single source) used to train the ML algorithm.

That was interesting because it appears that assumptions may have played a part in overlooking other aspects of the problem, or that the teams may have been overly confident about obtaining the correct results using the data available. In the examples cited those teams did figure those problems out and took corrective action. A follow-on article describing the process used to make their root cause determination in each case would be very interesting.

As an aside, from my perspective, this is why Explainable AI is so important. There are times that you just don’t know what you don’t know (the unknown unknowns). Being able to understand why and on what the AI is basing its decisions should help with providing better quality curated data up-front, as well as being able to identify potential drifts in the wrong direction while it is still early enough to make corrections without impacting deadlines or deliverables.

Item #3: 

This didn’t surprise me but should be a cause for concern as advances are made at faster rates and potentially less validation is made as organizations race to be first to market with some AI-based competitive advantage. The last paragraph under ‘Training data bias’ stated that based on a PWC survey, “only 25 percent of respondents said they would prioritize the ethical implications of an AI solution before implementing it.

Bonus Item:

The discussion about the value of unstructured data was very interesting, especially when you consider:

  1. The potential for NLU (natural language understanding) products in conjunction with ML and AI.
  2. The importance of semantic data analysis relative to any ML effort.
  3. The incredible value that products like MarkLogic’s database or Franz’s AllegroGraph provide over standard Analytics Database products.
    • I personally believe that the biggest exception to assertion this will be from GPU databases (like OmniSci) that easily handle streaming data, can accomplish extreme computational feats well beyond those of traditional CPU based products, and have geospatial capabilities that provide an additional dimension of insight to the problem being solved.

 

Update: This is a link to a related article that discusses trends in areas of implementation, important considerations, and the potential ROI of AI projects: https://www.fastcompany.com/90387050/reduce-the-hype-and-find-a-plan-how-to-adopt-an-ai-strategy

This is definitely an exciting space that will experience significant growth over the next 3-5 years. The more information, experiences, and lessons learned shared the better it will be for everyone.

Failing Productively

Posted on Updated on

As an entrepreneur you will typically get advice like, “Fail fast and fail often.” I always found this somewhat amusing, similar to the saying, “It takes money to make money” (a lot of bad investments are made using that philosophy). Living this yourself is an amazing experience – especially when things turn out well. But as I have mentioned before, you learn as much from the good experiences as you do from the bad ones.

Innovating is tough. You need people who are always thinking of different and better ways of doing things, or question why something has to be done or made a certain way. It takes confidence to ask questions that many would view as stupid (“Why would you do that, it’s always been done this way.”) When you have the right mix of people and culture, amazing things can happen and it feels great.

Innovating also takes a willingness to lose time and money, with the hope of winning something big enough later to make it all worthwhile. This is where a lot of companies fall short because they lack the patience, budget, or appetite to fail. I believe that this is why innovation often flows from small companies and small teams, as with them the prospect of doing something really cool is motivation enough to give something a try.

It takes a lot of discipline to follow a plan when a project appears to be failing, but it takes even more discipline to kill a project that has demonstrated real potential but isn’t meeting expectations. That was one of my first, and most important, lessons learned in this area. Let me explain…

In 2000 we looked at franchising our “consulting system” – processes, procedures, tools, metrics, etc. that were proven in our business. We believed that this could help average consultants deliver above average work products. It took a lot of work finding an attorney who would even consider they believed it would be impossible to proceduralize a somewhat ambiguous task like solving a business or technical problem. We found an attorney who after a 2-hour interview agreed to work with us (as he said, he “didn’t want to waste his time or our money on a fools errand.”)

We estimated it would take 12 months and cost $100,000 or less to fully develop. We met with potential prospects to validate the idea (it would have been illegal to pre-sell the system) and then got to work. Twelve months turned into 18, and the $100K budget increased almost 50%. But, all indications were positive and we felt very good about this effort.

Then, the terror attacks occurred on Sept. 11th and businesses everywhere saw a decline. In early 2002 we reevaluated the project and felt that it could be completed within the next 6-8 months, and would cost another $50K. After a long and emotional debate we decided to kill the project – not because we felt it would not work, but rather because there was less of a target market and now the payback period would double or triple. This was one of the most difficult business decisions that I ever made.

A big lesson learned was that our approach had to be more analytical. From that point forward we created a budget for “time off” (we bought our own time, as opposed to waiting for bench time) and for other project related items. We had a simple system for collecting and tracking ideas and feedback. And, when an idea felt right we would create a plan with a defined budget, milestones, and timeline. If the project failed to meet any of the defined objectives it would be killed. We documented what we did, why we did what we did, and would have postmortem reviews to learn as much as possible from every effort.

We still had failures, but with each one we took less time and spent less money. More importantly, we learned how to do this better, and that helped us realize several successes. It provided both the structure and the freedom to create some amazing things. And, since failing was an acceptable outcome it was never feared.

This was much more than just, “failing fast and failing often,” it was intelligent failure, and it worked for us.

Profitability through Operational Efficiency

Posted on

In my last post I discussed the importance of proper pricing for profitability and success. As most people know, you increase profitability by increasing revenue and/or decreasing costs. But, cost reduction doesn’t have to mean slashing headcount, wages, benefits, or other factors that could negatively affect morale and ultimately quality and customer satisfaction. There is often a better way.

The best businesses generally focus on repeatability, realizing that the more that you do something – anything, the better you should get at doing it. You develop a compelling selling story based on past successes, develop a solid reference base, and have identified the sweet spot from a pricing perspective. People keep buying what you are selling, and if your pricing is right there is money available at the end of the month to fund organic growth and operational efficiency efforts.

Finding ways to increase operational efficiency is the ideal way to reduce costs, but it does take time and effort to accomplish. Sometimes this is realized through increases in experience and skill. But, often optimization occurs through standardization and automation. Developing a system that works well, consistently applying it, measuring and analyzing the results, and then making changes to improve the process. An added benefit is that this approach increases quality as well, making your offering even more attractive.

Metrics should be collected at a “work package” level or lower (e.g., task level), which means they are related tasks at the lowest level that produce a discrete deliverable. This is a project management concept, and it works whether you are manufacturing something, building something, or creating something. This allows you to accurately create and validate cost and time estimates. And, when you are analyzing work at this level of detail it becomes easier to identify ways to simplify or automate the process.

When I had my company we leveraged this approach to win more business with competitive fixed price project bids that provided healthy profit margins for us while minimizing risk for our clients. Larger profit margins allowed us to fund ongoing employee training and education, fund innovation efforts, fund international expansion, and experiment with new things (products, technology, methodology, etc.) that were fun and often taught us something valuable. It was only possible because of our focus on doing everything as efficiently and effectively as possible, learning from everything we did– good and bad, and having a tangible way to measure and prove that we were constantly improving.

Think like a CEO, act like a COO, and measure like a CFO. Do this and make a real difference in your own business!

Connecting the Dots Faster

Posted on Updated on

When I started consulting an experienced consultant told me, “The best Consultants are experts at becoming Experts.” I started my consulting career with that goal in mind.  After a few years realized that, “Good consults are people who can learn enough quickly to ask intelligent questions and connect the dots faster.” What you quickly learn in business is that this is a great skill for anyone to have. Picture of bridge with many lights representing dots.

It’s impossible to be an expert at everything. I believe that it is important to have great depth in a few areas (true expertise), and breadth of knowledge in many areas (enhancing context and insight). Both types of knowledge alone are valuable, but combined add a dimension that I believe allows a person to be more effective and potentially much more valuable. You develop the ability to pick-up on the dependencies and nuances that others miss.

Just think – How much more effective a salesperson is that understands technology and project management concepts when working to demonstrate fit and create a sense of urgency. Or, an Attorney that understands the complexity of service offerings and delivery – enhancing their ability to construct agreements that are highly protective yet not overly complex or onerous. Or, a programmer that thinks beyond the requirements and looks for ways to improve or simplify the process.  Extra knowledge helps with the big picture understanding, and that often leads to providing more value. Additional knowledge and skills helps us become more effective, no matter what we may be doing.

Increased knowledge, combined with a desire to do amazing things, creates opportunities to make a huge impact. Sometimes it is because you are asking the questions that others may be thinking but cannot clearly and simply articulate. It helps you see the gaps and holes that others miss. And most importantly, it helps you “connect the dots” before others do (often many months before something obvious to you becomes obvious to others). A large consultancy once used the phrase “seeing around corners” as their attempt to make this concept tangible.

So, if you buy into the concept that knowledge is good, the next question is usually, “What is the best way to learn?” People learn in different ways so there really is no best way to learn. Understanding how you learn best helps you learn faster.

I’m a fan of reading. A good book may reinforce ideas you already know, introduce you to a few concepts or ideas that seem like they could help (giving you something to test), and often present many ideas that you know or feel just won’t work. Even bad books can have their value.  Just don’t become one of those people who changes their beliefs and approach with every book they read.

I’m also a fan of hands-on learning. The experience of doing something the first time is important. Keeping detailed notes (what works, what doesn’t make sense and what you did to figure it out, work-arounds, etc.) enhances the value of that experience. It’s amazing what you can learn when you “get your hands dirty.”

What about formal education? I’ve never been a fan of the person who wants to get a degree in order to get a promotion. There are certainly some professions where education is critical to success (often through legitimacy as much as anything else). I believe that the best way to get ahead is to learn the position, innovate, optimize, and then deliver incredible results. You won’t “knock it out of the park” every time, but those “base hits” will help you score and ultimately win. My advice to people is to work towards a specific degree because it is important as a personal goal, and because it might help you get a different or better job in the future.

This is not to say that formal education is bad, because I don’t believe that at all. I was working on my MBA at the same time I was extending my consulting business from the US to the UK. I had a concentration in International Business, so I could apply many things I was learning right away. This lucky coincidence enhanced my learning experience and helped me make better decisions. I was actually working on that degree to raise the bar for my own kids, so to me this was just a bonus.

There are also other great ways to learn – ways that are only require an investment of time. There are many good free online courses. If there is something you want to learn about, or need to know more about, there is almost always a place to find free or inexpensive training. These are great investments in yourself and your future, and a chance to learn to connect those dots faster.

Below are links to a few of my personal favorite free learning websites. Do yourself a favor and check them out. And, if you know of others leave a comment and recommend them to others.  Enjoy!

edX

Khan Academy

OpenCulture (directory with content from multiple sources)

Open Education Database (directory with content from multiple sources

Alison